Birding Trails Audubon

Travel Birding Trails in the West. Travel Birding Trails in the Midwest. These birds need your help. Get Audubon in Your Inbox. Let us send you the latest in bird and conservation news. Email address. Find Audubon Near You. Visit your local Audubon center, join a …

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How to Be a Low-Carbon Traveler Audubon

Opt for Offsets. No getting around it: Air travel is a huge driver of climate change. A round-trip ticket on a transatlantic flight can emit enough carbon to melt 30 square feet of sea ice, per one study. But flying is also hard to avoid, so consider carbon offsets. Sold by airlines and third parties, offsets balance your climate impact with

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Birdist Rule #102: Travel Like a Birder Audubon

Here are a few tips on how to travel efficiently and effectively, whether in the plane or in the car. Flying . Have you seen those overhead images of all the gear some professional photographers travel with, and it’s like 50,000 different lenses and bodies and gadgets and gizmos all arranged together? Like this. Okay, well, a perfectly

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Birding Freebies and Good Travel Deals Audubon

Travel is probably the top splurge for many birders: weeklong tropical getaways, festivals in remote landscapes, overnight pelagic cruises. But you don’t have to blow your budget by visiting far-flung birding destinations. There are stellar options close to home—as close as your own backyard even. Jazz up your property with native plants

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Birding in Hawaii Audubon

A comprehensive birding trip to Hawaii would include travel to four main islands: Kauai, Oahu, Maui, and the “big island” of Hawaii. Your itinerary should include Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Haleakala National Park, and Waimea Canyon. Most travelers first arrive in the capital city of Honolulu, on Oahu, where the tourism infrastructure

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These Masters of the Sky Can Fly for Hours (or Days) While

They travel in a general direction, guided largely by wind currents, and keep their eyes open for food to scavenge or prey that's relatively easy to catch. Golden Eagles, though, engage in more complex activities while soaring. They hunt small and medium-size mammals. They stake out and defend territories of around 6,000 acres.

audubon.org/news/these-masters-sky-can-fly-hours-or-days-while-barely-flapping

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Visiting the Randall Davey Audubon Center & Sanctuary

Visiting the Randall Davey Audubon Center & Sanctuary. Located at 1800 Upper Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501. Center grounds and restrooms are open to the public 8:00 am - 4:00 PM Monday through Saturday. Trails, grounds, and restrooms at the Randall Davey Audubon Center & Sanctuary are now open! Regularly scheduled bird walks and house tours

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American Robin Audubon Field Guide

A very familiar bird over most of North America, running and hopping on lawns with upright stance, often nesting on porches and windowsills. The Robin's rich caroling is among the earliest bird songs heard at dawn in spring and summer, often beginning just before first light. In fall and winter, robins may gather by the hundreds in roaming flocks, concentrating at sources of food.

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How to Tell a Raven From a Crow Audubon

Ravens often travel in pairs, while crows are seen in larger groups. Also, watch the bird’s tail as it flies overhead. The crow’s tail feathers are basically the same length, so when the bird spreads its tail, it opens like a fan. Ravens, however, have longer middle feathers in their tails, so their tail appears wedge-shaped when open.

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Mallards Ferry Fish Eggs Between Waterbodies Through Their

Mallards can travel up to 15 miles each day and fly several hundred miles between stops during migration. That means they could possibly disperse eggs to waterbodies near and far. "It's a preliminary but fascinating study,” says Peter Sorensen, a fisheries biologist studying invasive carps at the University of Minnesota who was not involved

audubon.org/news/mallards-ferry-fish-eggs-between-waterbodies-through-their-poop

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American Crow Audubon Field Guide

Crows are thought to be among our most intelligent birds, and the success of the American Crow in adapting to civilization would seem to confirm this. Despite past attempts to exterminate them, crows are more common than ever in farmlands, towns, and even cities, and their distinctive caw! is a familiar sound over much of the continent. Sociable, especially when not nesting, crows may gather

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Red Knot Audubon Field Guide

This chunky shorebird has a rather anonymous look in winter plumage, but is unmistakable in spring, when it wears robin-red on its chest. It nests in the far north, mostly well above the Arctic Circle (the first known nest was discovered during Admiral Peary's expedition to the North Pole in 1909); its winter range includes shorelines around the world, south to Australia and southern South

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Birding in Utah Audubon

Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge. Drive to the northern end of the Great Salt Lake to reach one of the West’s finest birding sites. Bear River’s nearly 80,000 acres comprise marsh, mudflats, and open water, providing vital feeding, resting, and nesting habitat for waterfowl, wading birds, shorebirds, and other species.

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Birding in Alaska Audubon

The Chamber of Commerce (www.cordovachamber.com) has information about travel and outdoor activities near the town. The shorebird festival is a great time to visit, with its field trips and expert presentations. Homer.

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Migratory Birds Like Native Berries Best Audubon

In the spring, neotropical migrants travel from Latin America to nest in the Northern Hemisphere, where they take advantage of budding plants and abundant insects. As winter approaches and food supply dwindles, birds move south and devour fall fruits along the way to fuel their trip.

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Puffin Tours Audubon Project Puffin

Hardy Boat Cruises, based in New Harbor on Maine's Pemaquid Peninsula, runs a Puffin Watch cruise in the Spring with Audubon naturalists starting in early June (and without Audubon naturalists beginning in mid-May). The trip departs daily at 5:30pm, and trips end in late August. The one and a half hour tour departs New Harbor for Eastern Egg

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Birding in Mississippi Audubon

Wading birds such as Great Egret, Snowy Egret, and White Ibis roost around the refuge lakes, and post-breeding Wood Stork arrives in late summer, when Roseate Spoonbill sometimes shows up. The lakes are home to thousands of waterfowl from fall through spring. Bald Eagle is another winter visitor and has nested here.

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Birding and Ecotourism in Colombia Audubon

Birding and Ecotourism in Colombia. With over 1,900 avian species—more than any other country in the world—Colombia is a birder’s paradise waiting to be discovered. Explore high elevation mountains, dry forest, páramo, and coastal habitats in search of an array of tropical avifauna, including flycatchers, hummingbirds, tanagers, toucans

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Costa Rica Untapped Audubon

International Travel Costa Rica Untapped. If you’re looking for real wilderness adventure in one of the world’s most popular nature travel destinations, get off the beaten path on the Osa Peninsula.

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Bullock's Oriole Audubon Field Guide

In the west, this oriole is common in summer in forest edge, farmyards, leafy suburbs, isolated groves, and streamside woods, especially in cottonwood trees. For several years it was considered to belong to the same species as the eastern Baltimore Oriole (with the two combined under the name Northern Oriole), because the two often interbreed where their ranges come in contact on the western

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Pacific Golden-Plover Audubon Field Guide

This bird is so similar to American Golden-Plover that the two were regarded as one species until 1993. However, the birds can tell the difference: where the two forms overlap in western Alaska, they seldom or never interbreed. Their migratory routes are strikingly different: American Golden-Plover migrates to South America, while Pacific Golden-Plover flies from Alaska to

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Spring Migration FAQs Audubon Connecticut

They travel between breeding grounds in the Arctic and winter foraging areas in the waters off Antarctica. Why would birds leave the tropics, where it is warm year-round, to come here?! Birds coming to us from the tropics are returning to their breeding grounds, where the days are longer and there is a greater abundance of food and space.

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Pacific-slope Flycatcher Audubon Field Guide

In humid woods along the Pacific Coast, this little flycatcher is very common in summer. It favors deep shade, often in the groves along streams; it often places its beautiful mossy nest under a bridge or under the eaves of a cabin in the woods. This species and the Cordilleran Flycatcher are almost identical except for callnotes and range, and were regarded as one species (called "Western

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California Quail Audubon Field Guide

This sharply-marked bird with the curving topknot is common along the California coast and in a few other areas of the west. It has adapted rather well to the increasing human population, and is often found around well-wooded suburbs and even large city parks. California Quail live in coveys at most seasons, and are often seen strutting across clearings, nodding their heads at each step. If

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Red-winged Blackbird Audubon Field Guide

Among our most familiar birds, Red-wings seem to sing their nasal songs in every marsh and wet field from coast to coast. They are notably bold, and several will often attack a larger bird, such as a hawk or crow, that flies over their nesting area. The red shoulder patches of the male, hidden under body feathers much of the time, are brilliantly displayed when he is singing. Outside the

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Common Raven Audubon Field Guide

Of the birds classified as perching birds or "songbirds," the Common Raven is the largest, the size of a hawk. Often its deep croaking call will alert the observer to a pair of ravens soaring high overhead. An intelligent and remarkably adaptable bird, living as a scavenger and predator, it can survive at all seasons in surroundings as different as hot desert and high Arctic tundra. Once

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Bank Swallow Audubon Field Guide

The smallest of our swallows, the Bank Swallow is usually seen in flocks, flying low over ponds and rivers with quick, fluttery wingbeats. It nests in dense colonies, in holes in dirt or sand banks. Some of these colonies are quite large, and a tall cut bank may be pockmarked with several hundred holes. Despite their small size, tiny bills, and small feet, these swallows generally dig their

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Plan Your Trip Iain Nicolson Audubon Center at Rowe

Plan Your Trip. Tips to help you maximize your visit. Use our on-line registration to select your activities. Reservations open at 9 am CT on January 3, 2022. Air Travel to Kearney, NE: The Kearney Regional Airport offers daily flights to and from Denver and Chicago. The airport is …

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Birding and Ecotourism in Belize Audubon

Travel to Colombia to See Its Amazing Birds. Explore mountains, dry forest, and coastal habitats in search of tropical birds with Holbrook Travel's Flyway Expeditions, an …

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Birding in Pennsylvania Audubon

Presque Isle is a seven-mile-long peninsula stretching into Lake Erie from the city of Erie. In spring, migrant birds following the shore travel the length of the peninsula and are “trapped” at the end when they find themselves nearly surrounded by water. …

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Broad-tailed Hummingbird Audubon Field Guide

The metallic wing-trill of the male Broad-tailed Hummingbird is a characteristic sound of summer in the mountain west. This sound is often heard as a flying bird zings past unseen. The birds are seen easily enough, however, at masses of flowers in the high meadows, where they hover and dart around the blossoms, often fighting and chasing each other away from choice patches.

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Birding in Nebraska Audubon

Travel diagonally through Nebraska from Missouri to Wyoming—a distance of about 490 miles—and you’ll find habitats ranging from hardwood forest and prairie to the ponderosa pine woodland of the Pine Ridge. But Nebraska is perhaps best known for its Sandhills: rolling grassland dunes that span 20,000 square miles, a quarter of the state.

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Guided Crane Viewing Experience Iain Nicolson Audubon

Directions: Take I-80 Exit 285 (Gibbon exit) and drive south two miles to Elm Island Road, then turn west (right) onto Elm Island Road and travel two miles to the Center parking lot entrance located on the north side of the road. Drive time from south Kearney to the Iain Nicolson Audubon Center is …

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Birding in Georgia Audubon

The southern tip of Jekyll Island is one of most famous birding sites in Georgia, with possibilities such as sea ducks (winter), Northern Gannet (winter), shorebirds including American Avocet and American Oystercatcher, jaegers (winter), gulls, and terns. Many rarities have appeared here over the years, including Common Eider and Great Shearwater.

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Meet Nish and Nellie, Ohio's First Nesting Piping Plovers

That evening, Kaufman documented the first Piping Plover egg being laid in Ohio since the 1930s. The next day, the agency installed a wire predator guard, called an exclosure, over the nest to protect the eggs. Nellie laid the celebrated fourth egg just five days later, resulting in a full clutch, and the birds began officially incubating.

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Sandhill Crane Facts Iain Nicolson Audubon Center at

Flight speed & distance: 25 - 35 mph; cranes typically travel 200 - 300 miles in a day, but can reach 500 miles with a good tail wind. Nesting: For migratory populations, nesting begins early April to late May. Non-migratory populations begin in December to early March.

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Ruby-throated Hummingbird Audubon Field Guide

Hundreds of kinds of hummingbirds nest in the American tropics, and more than a dozen in the western U.S., but east of the Great Plains there is only the Ruby-throat. There it is fairly common in summer in open woods and gardens. Hovering in front of a flower to sip nectar, it beats its wings more than 50 times per second. Impressive migrants despite their small size, some Ruby-throats may

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Western Tanager Audubon Field Guide

A western counterpart to the Scarlet Tanager, this species occurs in summer farther north than any other tanager -- far up into northwestern Canada. Western Tanagers nest in coniferous forests of the north and the high mountains, but during migration they may show up in any habitat, including grassland and desert; the bright males often draw attention by pausing in suburban yards in late spring.

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Black Birders Week 2021 Audubon

While not an official organizer, Audubon is proud to be a partner of #BlackBirdersWeek2021. Audubon will Facebook livestream the #SafeInNature discussion with Monique Pipkin, M.S. and Dr. Amelia Demery, M.S. on fieldwork safety on Thursday, June 3, from 7:00 – 8:00 pm ET. We encourage the Audubon network and birders everywhere to support the

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Northern Flicker Audubon Field Guide

This brown woodpecker flashes bright colors under the wings and tail when it flies. Its ringing calls and short bursts of drumming can be heard in spring almost throughout North America. Two very different-looking forms -- Yellow-shafted Flicker in the east and north, and Red-shafted Flicker in the west -- were once considered separate species. They interbreed wherever their ranges come in

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Birding in Wisconsin Audubon

3,194,612. Wisconsin borders two of the great lakes and boasts more than 15,000 smaller ones, so it shouldn’t be surprising that the state is a splendid place to see waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds of all kinds. Several spots along Lake Michigan are good both for waterbirds and as “migrant traps” for songbirds traveling along the

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The Staying Power of Snapping Turtles Audubon

The Staying Power of Snapping Turtles. Sure, snapping turtles are sometimes irascible and always prehistoric-looking. But these relics, which have been around for 90 million years, are the ultimate survivors. Snapping turtles spend most of their time in water, where they are much less aggressive than they are on land.

audubon.org/magazine/march-april-2012/the-staying-power-snapping-turtles

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Cactus Wren Audubon Field Guide

Big and bold, with strong markings and a harsh rasping voice, this bird is very different from our other temperate-zone wrens. It represents a tropical group of large, sociable wrens, with eight species in Mexico and a few more farther south. Cactus Wrens are common in our desert southwest. They are usually seen in pairs or family parties, strutting on the ground or hopping in the brush, often

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Is the Atwatter's Prairie-Chicken Starting to Make a

16 hours ago · Pledge to stand with Audubon to call on elected officials to listen to science and work towards climate solutions. Sign the Pledge In April, biologists at the Attwater Prairie Chicken National Wildlife Refuge—a 10,000-acre stretch of tallgrass prairie an …

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Explore a Habitat Patch Audubon

1 day ago · Pledge to stand with Audubon to call on elected officials to listen to science and work towards climate solutions. Sign the Pledge Every spring, Cliff Swallows start construction. They patiently stack pellets of mud, like little bricks, that harden into nests. As their name hints, the birds

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Photos Capture New Flows in Colorado River Delta Audubon

14 hours ago · The National Audubon Society protects birds and the places they need, today and tomorrow, throughout the Americas using science, advocacy, education, and …

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